News Release

35th annual Trouble in Toyland report uncovers mislabeled and dangerous toys

As holidays near, spotlight on nine toy hazards to avoid during gift-giving, sheltering-in-place
For Immediate Release

PHILADELPHIA --  PennPIRG Education Fund’s Trouble in Toyland report has helped identify dangerous toys for 35 years. But 2020 is unique, and as Americans have worked, learned and played from home to protect themselves from COVID-19, children could be more susceptible to certain toy-related hazards. 

 

“This has been an incredibly difficult year, and parents and caregivers are overwhelmed. They might do a quick search online for a toy to entertain their kids and trust that manufacturers and online vendors are guaranteeing their safety. This isn’t always the case, so parents need to be on guard,” said Emma Horst-Martz, PennPIRG Education Fund’s Advocate.

 

Because of the pandemic, many parents are working from home while trying to keep kids of multiple ages busy with safe activities they can perform without supervision. This can be a daunting task. Our researchers found that many toys have hidden dangers or missing warning labels and playthings such as magnets, balloons and smaller toys can be deadly if they fall into younger children’s hands.  

 

Here are some of the main categories from this year’s findings:

 

  • Choking Hazards: From small parts included in toy sets, to game pieces, many toys are not safe for children 2 years old or younger. This year’s report uncovered multiple examples of choking hazards that either lack a proper warning online or don’t have the mandatory warning label on the packaging. 

  • Loud Noises: Incredibly noisy toys played on repeat aren’t just annoying. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), sounds with decibel levels of more than 80 can cause potential hearing damage in children, and noises between 100 and 120 decibels can cause damage if they last more than one minute. Our researchers found a toy fire truck for sale on Amazon noisy enough to potentially damage a kid's hearing. 

  • High-Powered Magnets: Magnets of all types have posed risks to children for years. Some are part of toy building sets aimed at children as young as 3 years old, although some children that age don’t know not to eat or inhale them. And some magnets aren’t intended for kids; they’re more like fidget toys for adults, who can use “recreational” magnets to create shapes or figures. 

  • Recalled Toys: PennPIRG Education Fund researchers found three separate recalled toys for sale on eBay, and in two cases, found full pages selling the recalled products. 

“The pandemic has led to more unsupervised play for children of all ages,” said Horst-Martz. “Because of this, prevention is the best medicine! To protect your children, do your homework and make sure dangerous products don’t get into your house in the first place.

“Children are our most precious resource, and the work of children is play,” said Amy Bollinger, manager of Pediatric Trauma and Injury Prevention at Penn State Children’s Hospital. “As parents and caregivers, it is our responsibility to ensure that children are learning through play without risk of traumatic injury. We can reduce that risk by supervising play, ensuring that toys are developmentally appropriate and in good working order, and by setting ground rules.”

### 

The PennPIRG Education Fund is an independent, non-partisan group that works for consumers and the public interest. The PennPIRG Education Fund is part of The Public Interest Network, which operates and supports organizations committed to a shared vision of a better world and a strategic approach to getting things done. Through research, public education and outreach, we serve as counterweights to the influence of powerful special interests that threaten our health, safety or well-being.

Support Us

Your donation supports PennPIRG's work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up to date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code



PennPIRG is part of The Public Interest Network, which operates and supports organizations committed to a shared vision of a better world and a strategic approach to social change.